Filing Homeowners Insurance Claims Properly

Tips to make sure you get what’s yours when filing a claim

Filing a homeowners insurance claim is never a pleasant process. While you may hope you’ll never need to call upon the coverage of your homeowners insurance policy, in the event that you do it is important to properly file your claim. Attention to detail can be a challenge when you’re dealing with the aftermath of an emergency, but every step you take ensures that you get the most out of the home insurance coverage you’ve paid for. 

Filing Homeowners Insurance Claims ProperlyHere’s what you need to know when filing a homeowners insurance claim: 

  1. Inform the police. If theft, vandalism or burglary is involved, report it to the police immediately. From there, get a copy of their official report and keep records of all law enforcement officers you speak with.
  2. Make a list of all lost or damaged items. You’ll need this info when you speak with your homeowners insurance company, and if you have a written and/or photographed inventory of your home’s contents to reference, all the better. Also, resist the temptation to remove any damaged belongings from the scene, as the homeowners insurance claims adjuster will need all items present for review and assessment.
  3. Phone your homeowners insurance company. As soon as possible, call your insurance company and open your claim. The representative will walk you through related coverage details and initiate scheduling for an adjuster inspection, fire or water damage cleanup service or restoration contractor.
  4. Take photos or video of the damaged portion of the property. Keep any pictures or tapes with the rest of your homeowners insurance claim records, including a duplicate set in case you need to provide it to investigating authorities.
  5. Make temporary repairs. Within reason and as advised by your insurance agent, make temporary repairs to prevent further damage to your property. Keep related receipts on file for later reimbursement by the insurer.
  6. If you have to relocate, keep your receipts. Repair and restoration after severe property damage may require alternative accommodations for you and your family. So be sure to keep records of all additional expenses you incur, as “loss of use” is among the coverages in most homeowners insurance policies, and should be included when filing your homeowners insurance claim.

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Comments

hi

this would be nice.. il try to file a homeowners insurance claim...

homeowners cancelled for filing claim

We have, or had, Nationwide - they are not on our or your side.

We suffered a loss when a ceiling panel panel collapsed from ice buildup this past winter which was not visible, we also had extensive water damage.

This was not due to, nor were we faulted by the company, for any neglect.

This had never happened before - we own and have lived in the home for ten years.

It was a $2250. loss.

We were asked to make some changes to the roof structure, as the pitch was inadequate. Nationwide inspected our home before agreeing to provide homeowners - nothing had changed in the structure since then nor were thier any problems.

The repairs we made were above and beyond what we were asked to perform. We spent the whole amount for the entire scope of repairs on their requirements-leaving other things (cosmetic) undone. Had we merely complied w/the required repairs it would not have fixed the problem

In the prior year we had spent $8500. on painting our home and a new metal roof (the portion which was damaged already had a metal roof). Our home is a modest cape but no hovel. We spent an additional $1000. on additional repairs we were not required to make but were advised to do so by the contractors who performed the repairs required by Nationwide.

We were told our policy would be cancelled for noncompliance despite sending all receipts to our local office as well as their 'headquarters'.

We sent an explanation (certified) of all the work we had done (professionally) and recieved no response.

This presents quite a dilemna. We will likely be blacklisted since we have not been renewed. All of this trouble for doing the right thing and being responsible.

I would encourage Nationwide policy holders to find another lest they are victimized by their chicanery as we have been.

I would also encourage homeowners to do a little research on the record of homeowners insurance providers particularly how many they 'drop'.

Unbeknownst to us until this year - Nationwide lost a class action lawsuit last year-I don't wonder why.