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  • Transcript

    LESLIE: Bill in South Carolina needs some help painting the siding of his house. What can we do for you?

     
    BILL: Yes, we have cedar siding on our house and the house was built in 1994. And the part of the house that’s cedar siding, where the paint was applied, is now peeling and this is the second time it’s peeling. The paint is not peeling completely but it’s peeling in spots. What can I do to stop this? What do I need to do to use as an undercoat?
     
    TOM: Bill, when the house was built, do you know what kind of building paper was put under the cedar siding?
     
    BILL: I really don’t know. I think it was a standard Styrofoam half-inch insulation. And I noticed that the part that’s peeling is in direct sunlight. The rest of it is painted; it’s not direct sunlight, doesn’t peel.
     
    TOM: Interesting. Well, you’re certainly going to get a little more wear and tear when the UV is exposed to it. Do you know if the siding was back-primed before it was installed? Because, typically, the installation recommendations for cedar siding that’s going to be painted is that you back-prime the siding. In other words, you prime the back side of the siding that you don’t see to be able to control the moisture and the humidity inside the board. Do you know if that was done?
     
    BILL: I’m sure it was not.
     
    TOM: OK. Well, that might be part of the problem. You know, at this point, all you’re going to be able to do, Bill, is to take out that – try to sand out the peely part and then to prime it with an oil-based primer like a KILZ or something of that nature that’s going to give you good adhesion. If it’s a fairly limited area and you’re able to cut out the piece, then what you simply could do is back-prime the repair piece so that this particular section that peels a lot has the proper preparation.
     
    BILL: Do they make a stain available to do that? A white stain?
     
    TOM: Yeah, certainly there’s white stain available but you can’t put solid-color stain on top of wood that’s already been painted.
     
    BILL: I see.
     
    LESLIE: Without stripping the paint.
     
    TOM: Right, if you had told us that it wasn’t painted, we probably would be recommending solid-color stain because it doesn’t peel.
     
    BILL: I see. Thank you so much, Tom.
     
    TOM: You’re welcome. Thanks so much for calling us at 888-MONEY-PIT.

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