More from Sick Homes

Mold Free Home: Top 10 Tips

Over the last decade, mold has risen to become one of the most damaging toxins that we face in our everyday lives.  Due in part to tighter, more energy efficient home construction practices, a mold problem, while relatively easy to eradicate in small quantities, can quickly escalate  to a size...

Siding, Columns and Trim

Mold is usually easy to identify, but some other types of growth and staining can masquerade as mold. If you've found growth or markings that resemble mold, take time to confirm that they're not actually one of the following mold look-alikes.

Green staining on the outside of the house: If...

Walls and Ceilings

Mold needs two things to survive and spread: moisture and food. Because it's susceptible to moisture, traditional paper-faced drywall is mold's favorite sandwich, with two outer faces of paper as the bread and the gypsum stuck in the middle as baloney. Gypsum is a mineral, and though mold cannot...

Identifying Mold

A professional mold inspector can be very helpful if conducted correctly, but an increasing awareness of the dangers of mold has likewise increased the number of so-called "professional mold testers" who don't understand the relationship between contaminants found in the air or dust and the...

Chimneys

Sources of carbon monoxide in the home can be significant, and as a professional home inspector who has completed thousands of heating system examinations, it is astounding the number of times I find a problem with carbon monoxide leakage. Severity ranges, but it is not unusual to find life...

Mold and Real Estate
Buying a foreclosed home is not as easy as it sounds. It would seem like bargain hunting on a grand scale and when gazing up a tree-lined street featuring foreclosed homes, you may think there's homeowner's gold in them there hills.  But beware before buying a foreclosed home. Foreclosed homes...